Deep bed scrubber/Gas-phase filtration

Deep bed scrubber/Gas-phase filtration

Gas-phase filtration uses two main filtration processes:

  1. Adsorption. Adsorption takes places when the molecules of a substance in the air physically come into contact with the surface of the adsorbents.
    Different adsorbents are more likely to attract certain types of molecules and chemicals, leaving other types of substances in the air. Adsorption is most effective at lower levels of temperature and humidity. Typical adsorbents include activated carbon, activated alumina, silica gel and porous clay minerals.
  2. Chemisorption. Chemisorption is based on a chemical reaction between the sorbent itself or the chemicals contained in the sorbent. Chemical reactions form chemical compounds that adhere to the sorbing medium or turn into harmless materials such as carbon dioxide or water. Sometimes a chemisorption process can transform vapors and gases in the air into substances that can be easily adsorbed by other sorbing materials.

In areas where the concentration of pollutants in the air is high, Deep bed systems are used most often. Filters in these systems have a greater thickness and mass of filter material for greater exposure to the sorbing media. They can also be used in high pressure systems. The service life of the thicker filter media is longer, and therefore their replacement is less frequent.

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